Press

My books have been featured in venues like Publishers Weekly, Kirkus Reviews, The Dallas Morning News, Literary Hub, PEN America, Words Without Borders, World Literature Today, Los Angeles Review of Books, The Hindu, The Hindustan Times, The Times of India, and more.

For the latest publications, please click here. For news/press about Desi Books, please click here. To contact about an interview or feature, please use the contact page. Click below for news and interviews related to specific books. Media folks: please find a complete press kit here.

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the shehnai virtuoso dhumketu translator jenny bhattThe first substantive English translation of the Gujarati short story pioneer, Dhumketu (1892–1965.) The first book-length Gujarati to English translation published in the US.

Pronunciation guide: “shehnai” = “shay-huh-naa-yi”; “Dhumketu” = “dhoom-kay-tu”; “Gujarati” = “Gu-juh-raa-ti”

[This is the 2022 US edition. For the 2020 Indian edition, click here.]

CLICK FOR BOOK DETAILS AND BUYING LINKS

“Dhumketu is a wonderfully gripping storyteller . . . Bhatt has certainly done him justice in this excellent selection.” ~JENNIFER CROFT, translator of The Books of Jacob by Olga Tokarczuk

“The translator . . . follows each dip and tremor in the narrative flow with practised ease and linguistic flair . . .” ~N KALYAN RAMAN, translator of The Story of a Goat by Perumal Murugan

“Jenny Bhatt transposes the lushness of life as described by [Dhumketu] . . . in new, important, florid, and disciplined renderings.” ~RAJIV MOHABIR, translator of I Even Regret Night: Holi Songs of Demerara by Lalbihari Sharma.

“A selection of treasures from Dhumketu’s profound stories . . . a translation that itself sparks and flames.” ~THOMAS HITOSHI PRUIKSMA, translator of The Kural by Tiruvalluvar.

Dhumketu (1892–1965) was the pen name of Gaurishankar Govardhanram Joshi, one of Gujarat’s most prolific writers in the early-20th century. During his lifetime, he wrote some 600 short stories in twenty-six volumes, twenty-nine historical and seven social novels, various plays, travelogues, memoirs, and more. He was also an avid translator of Rabindranath Tagore and Kahlil Gibran.

It is fair to say that he is the Gujarati Chekhov or Tagore. He pioneered the short story form in Gujarati literature, taking it beyond mere storytelling to a creative art form with advanced literary devices, universal themes, and characters drawn from all walks of life — rural to royal, young to old. In particular, his strong, independent-minded women and emotionally sensitive men were well ahead of their time. Many of these stories, if transposed to contemporary times, would still work just as well as in their time.

When Dhumketu’s first collection of short stories, Tankha, came out in 1926, it revolutionized the genre in India. Characterized by a fine sensitivity, deep humanism, perceptive observation, and an intimate knowledge of both rural and urban life, his fiction has provided entertainment and edification to generations of Gujarati readers and speakers.

The Shehnai Virtuoso brings together the first substantial collection of Dhumketu’s work to be available in English in the US. Beautifully translated for a wide new audience by Jenny Bhatt, these much-loved stories — like the finest literature — remain remarkable and relevant even today.

Unfortunately, in addition to suffering the same neglect as many other regional language writers in India (there is a language hierarchy or pyramid where certain Indian languages get translated and published more than others), Dhumketu’s brilliance has been forgotten because, in India, the short story form has also lost the audience it once enjoyed. With this translation, I hope to help shine a brighter spotlight on his rich legacy.

“. . . a love letter to the power of art and the human spirit . . . These stories invite readers to rediscover the wonder in the quotidian.” ~KIRKUS REVIEWS

“Complex characters, vibrant imagery, and descriptions of rural Gujarat State bolster each of the stories. Readers are in for a treat.” ~PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

“Jenny Bhatt’s skillful translation takes advantage of the unique place that English occupies on the subcontinent. […] To read Dhumketu is to be reminded of the ways in which the short story can be stretched and shaped organically, while always remaining true to its exquisite form.” ~WORDS WITHOUT BORDERS (Rishi Reddi)

“. . . a kaleidoscope, abundant in variegating depictions of both landscapes and the human interiors populating them.” ~ASYMPTOTE JOURNAL (Andrea Blatz)

“. . . a magical Guajarati storyteller has arrived on North American shores to share a broad selection of his well-loved tales with a wider contemporary audience, a journey made possible by an attentive and gifted translator.” ~roughghosts (Joseph Schreiber)

“. . . Dhumketu shows considerable range. He is clearly a talented story-writer . . . a very welcome — and long overdue — introduction to a significant writer, from a language and tradition from which only a smattering has previously been accessible to English-speaking readers. This is a generous, wide-ranging selection, offering a very good variety — an excellent sampler, even if it only offers one-twentieth (!) of the author’s story-output alone.” ~THE COMPLETE REVIEW (Michael Orthofer)

“. . . Dhumketu’s short stories have all the elements of poetry built on the foundation of memorable imagery. And Jenny Bhatt’s translation of Dhumketu’s Gujarati makes the imagery vivid for Anglophone readers.” ~KHABAR MAGAZINE (Dr. Rajesh C. Oza)

“. . . Dhumketu’s insights show that, while times change, human nature does not. It is these little pearls of wisdom that make Dhumketu’s stories timeless and relevant today.” ~ASIAN REVIEW OF BOOKS (Jane Wallace)

“While Dhumketu wrote his stories in the faraway Gujarat of the early 20th century, he remains relevant to the modern reader with an open heart and an appreciation for poetic writing . . .” ~INDIA CURRENTS (Rajesh C. Oza)

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ratno dholi dhumketuThe first substantive translation of the Gujarati short story pioneer, Dhumketu (1892–1965)

Shortlisted for the PFC-VoW Book Awards 2021 for English Translation from Regional Languages

Pronunciation guide: “Ratno Dholi” = “Rut-no Dhow-lee”; “Dhumketu” = “dhoom-kay-tu”; “Gujarati” = “Gu-juh-raa-ti

[This is the 2020 Indian edition. For the updated 2022 US edition, click here.]

CLICK FOR BOOK DETAILS AND BUYING LINKS.

“How do you hold the gaze long enough on a spark, the ‘tankha’? Dhumketu’s stories appeared in Gujarati literature like sparks, or comets, lighting up the sky, creating a desire to hear more, and see more. Generations in Gujarat have grown up on Dhumketu’s stories. Although not the first, Dhumketu is the most renowned short-story writer. Jenny Bhatt’s labor in understanding, contextualizing, interpreting, and translating him deserves our gratitude and attention. Without translations, we would be living a self-absorbed life, not learning about anyone else in the world!”
– Rita Kothari, Professor at Ashoka University; translator of The Greatest Gujarati Short Stories Ever Told

“The brilliant and prolific writer, Dhumketu, is an integral part of the Gujarati canon. Jenny Bhatt’s empathetic and intuitive translations convey the signature and nuance of his short stories, and make this iconic voice available for readers around the world.”
– Namita Gokhale, Author; Founder and Co-director of the Jaipur Literature Festival and Mountain Echoes, the Bhutan Literature Festival; Director of Yatra Books, a publishing house specializing in translation

“A comet that flew through other linguistic skies now visits the Anglophone firmament. Train your telescopes, ladies and gentlemen, Dhumketu is here!”
– Jerry Pinto, Author and Translator; most recently, of Baburao Bagul’s Marathi short stories, The Day I Hid My Caste and Other Stories

“Dhumketu wrote nearly 500 short stories, and this beautifully translated, brilliant, and glittering collection from his oeuvre will go a long way in reminding readers about one of the finest short-story writers from India.”
– Aruni Kashyap, Assistant Professor at the University of Georgia; Author and Translator of Indira Goswami’s last work of fiction, The Bronze Sword of Thengphakhri Tehsildar

Dhumketu (1892–1965) was the pen name of Gaurishankar Govardhanram Joshi, one of Gujarat’s most prolific writers in the early-20th century. During his lifetime, he wrote some 600 short stories in twenty-six volumes, twenty-nine historical and seven social novels, various plays, travelogues, memoirs, and more. He was also an avid translator of Rabindranath Tagore and Kahlil Gibran.

It is fair to say that he is the Gujarati Chekhov or Tagore. He pioneered the short story form in Gujarati literature, taking it beyond mere storytelling to a creative art form with advanced literary devices, universal themes, and characters drawn from all walks of life — rural to royal, young to old. In particular, his strong, independent-minded women and emotionally sensitive men were well ahead of their time. Many of these stories, if transposed to contemporary times, would still work just as well as in their time.

When Dhumketu’s first collection of short stories, Tankha, came out in 1926, it revolutionized the genre in India. Characterized by a fine sensitivity, deep humanism, perceptive observation, and intimate knowledge of both rural and urban life, his fiction has provided entertainment and edification to generations of Gujarati readers and speakers.

Ratno Dholi brings together the first substantial collection of Dhumketu’s work to be available in English in the US. Beautifully translated for a wide new audience by Jenny Bhatt, these much-loved stories — like the finest literature — remains remarkable and relevant even today.

Unfortunately, in addition to suffering the same neglect as many other regional language writers in India (there is a language hierarchy or pyramid where certain Indian languages get translated and published more than others), Dhumketu’s brilliance has been forgotten because, in India, the short story form has also lost the audience it once enjoyed. With this translation, I hope to help shine a brighter spotlight on his rich legacy.

“. . . powerful plots, which Dhumketu handles with sensitivity and with a sense of the subtly moving that is never mawkish. [ . . .] the English translation is reasonably fast-paced and eminently accessible. [. . .] This collection is an essential read.” ~Hindustan Times

“The translator of this collection, Jenny Bhatt, contextualizes his work in the introduction while providing insightful details about his craft.” ~The Hindu

“The translator is deeply engaged with the context of each story and follows each dip and tremor in the narrative flow with practiced ease and linguistic flair.” ~Indian Literature (a Sahitya Akademi publication)

“The mellifluous translation is as close as one can get to Dhumketu’s original [. . .] well-informed choices for pivotal words open new possibilities of re-readings for a Gujarati reader. Rendering terms and expressions, idioms, and traditions of a bygone world into an alien language is a delicate job: it requires patient and skillful negotiation across two periods, two cultures, and two languages. Bhatt has accomplished the task sensitively.” ~Indian Express

“. . . depth in each of the 22 stories in this book, which means that a) the translator has done an excellent job and b) every story in the book is satisfying . . .” ~Deccan Chronicle

“The collection scores well on the two fronts of readability and its ability to spark the interest of the reader. It succeeds in doing this by maintaining a fine balance between the familiar and the foreign. […] Jenny Bhatt’s Ratno Dholi, a volume of selected stories from Dhumketu, is an attempt to reach out to the roots of Gujarat’s literary imagination and present something of its wealth . . .” ~The Book Review

“Dhumketu’s layered exploration of human psychology and behavior are what make his short stories so impactful. There is definitely a master-class spread out across these pages for those who are interested in the technical aspects of writing short stories. Jenny Bhatt’s translation is nuanced but simple, and does justice to these stories.” ~Womensweb.in

Writer’s Melon | Video interview: Getting published in the US & translation of short stories | Jenny Bhatt. February 2023.

The Quint | ‘Tomb of Sand’ – And Why There is No Such Thing as ‘Untranslatability’. Story by Ayesha Jain. by June 2022.

The Hindu | Dropping their invisibility: 12 Indian translators discuss their forthcoming works. Story by Anusua Mukherjee. May 2022.

Chitralekha Magazine | Heart-to-heart with Jenny Bhatt (in Gujarati) by Ketan Trivedi. December 2021.

Global Voices | Literary translation from South Asia lags in international markets. Interview by Dr. Sangita Swechcha. September 2021.

Valley of Words | An Author’s Word: Jenny Bhatt. Interview. August 2021.

BlogChatter | A Reader, An Author, and A Translator Together Make a Translation Successful Say Jenny Bhatt and Jayasree Kalathil. August 2021.

Purple Pencil Project | In Conversation with Jenny Bhatt. Interview by Prakruti Maniar. July 2021.

Bombay Reads | ‘I Aimed to Stay True to the Writer’s Intention’. Interview by Noman Ahmed Shaikh. November 2020.

India Booked Podcast | ‘Gujarat, Dhumketu, and Translations’. Interview by Ayushi Mona. November 2020.

Firstpost | ‘Bringing Dhumketu to a new century: Jenny Bhatt discusses translating the pioneering Gujarati writer’s short stories’. Interview by Aishwarya Sahasrabudhe. November 2020.

Scroll.in | ‘A debut can happen at any age. Coming late to publishing doesn’t mean coming late to writing.’ Interview by Urvashi Bahuguna. November 2020.

The New Indian Express | ‘Timeless Connections’. Interview by Monika Monalisa. October 2020.

The Quint | ‘Tomb of Sand’ – And Why There is No Such Thing as ‘Untranslatability’. Story by Ayesha Jain. by June 2022.

The Hindu | Dropping their invisibility: 12 Indian translators discuss their forthcoming works. Story by Anusua Mukherjee. May 2022.

Chitralekha Magazine | Heart-to-heart with Jenny Bhatt (in Gujarati) by Ketan Trivedi. December 2021.

Global Voices | Literary translation from South Asia lags in international markets. Interview by Dr. Sangita Swechcha. September 2021.

Valley of Words | An Author’s Word: Jenny Bhatt. Interview. August 2021.

BlogChatter | A Reader, An Author, and A Translator Together Make a Translation Successful Say Jenny Bhatt and Jayasree Kalathil. August 2021.

Purple Pencil Project | In Conversation with Jenny Bhatt. Interview by Prakruti Maniar. July 2021.

Bombay Reads | ‘I Aimed to Stay True to the Writer’s Intention’. Interview by Noman Ahmed Shaikh. November 2020.

India Booked Podcast | ‘Gujarat, Dhumketu, and Translations’. Interview by Ayushi Mona. November 2020.

Firstpost | ‘Bringing Dhumketu to a new century: Jenny Bhatt discusses translating the pioneering Gujarati writer’s short stories’. Interview by Aishwarya Sahasrabudhe. November 2020.

Scroll.in | ‘A debut can happen at any age. Coming late to publishing doesn’t mean coming late to writing.’ Interview by Urvashi Bahuguna. November 2020.

The New Indian Express | ‘Timeless Connections’. Interview by Monika Monalisa. October 2020.

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A Foreword INDIES 2020 Book of the Year winner in the Short Stories Award Category and a finalist in the Multicultural Adult Fiction category.

One of the most anticipated debuts of 2020 at Electric Literature, Literary Hub, The Millions, Kirkus Reviews, Entropy Magazine, Debutiful, Ms. Magazine, Bustle. One of the best story collections of 2020 at Bustle and Largehearted Boy. One of the best collections of 2020 by Asian authors at Book Riot. Fiction bestseller at Small Press Distribution for July & August, September & October, November & December, January & February, and May. A story in The Best American Mystery and Suspense 2021 anthology.

“But Bhatt always allows us to see the real want beneath the performance, the kindness and anxiety and lust, there, too.” ~Elizabeth McCracken, Electric Literature

“Jenny Bhatt’s gorgeous stories in Each of Us Killers remind me why I love to read a good book. It is such a pleasure to be immersed in the worlds of her characters, in their hunger for love or money, and in their local and global struggles to live. With mouth-watering detail, Bhatt serves up a rich and varied feast.” ~Devi S. Laskar, author of The Atlas of Reds and Blues

“The potent stories in this collection evoke the complexities of a shifting, multilingual world with great precision. Bhatt moves between countries and realities with tremendous skill and insight.” ~ Idra Novey, author of Those Who Knew

“In Each of Us Killers, Jenny Bhatt excavates her characters with incisiveness, nuance, and complexity. The cast of vibrant characters in this wonderful collection is absolutely unique and memorable.” ~Karen E. Bender, author of The New Order

“This is a gorgeous collection. Bhatt weaves together, with the lightest touch, profound themes—work, ambition, displacement, class, and gender, and so much more. Her plots are beautifully rendered and her scope vast; her characters and her settings come to life on the page. These stories are full of bitter heartbreak with a measure of joy—a wonderful collection from a hugely talented writer.” ~Lydia Kiesling, author of The Golden State

“These stories are filled with wisdom and compassion, bristling with dark occurrences and gleaming with quiet moments of joy: an enriching collection.” ~Mahesh Rao, author of Polite Society

“In a series of thrilling, beautiful stories, Jenny Bhatt moves through the moods, thoughts, subversions involved in the experience of interracial relationships, East-West communications, theft, justice, migration. The collection works brilliantly both as an evocative amalgam of insightful observations about race, class, gender, aspirations, as well as on the sentence level. Bhatt writes, “polish it carefully, till it glitters with the hope of a false diamond and refracts your stark life into a spectrum of luminous rays, lighting up the darkness briefly”–referring to a character’s particular memory, but could just as well be referring to the collection as a whole.” ~Chaya Bhuvaneswar, author of White Dancing Elephants

“Moving, haunting stories that explore a wide range of complex social inequities and yet share an undercurrent of a deep and very human kind of longing.” ~Aatif Rashid, author of Portrait of Sebastian Khan

“Sex, death, redemption, betrayal—this collection has it all, from the sordid to the divine. Bhatt’s vivid imagination and well-voiced characters will take you on a ride you won’t soon forget.” ~Mathangi Subramanian, author of A People’s History of Heaven

Each of Us Killers offers up a complex portrait of our times. From caste-based violence to domestic power play, from yoga to the under-seam of real-estate development, Bhatt uses a dozen devices to examine the lives of people around us, the choices that define them and, ultimately, our selves.” ~Annie Zaidi, author of Unbound, 2000 Years of Indian Women’s Writing

“Ambitious, sensitive, this collection locates some essential Indian truths, especially its hidden violence.” ~Prayaag Akbar, author of Leila

“. . . rich debut collection . . . memorable . . . a powerful expression of the hunger for success on one’s own terms.” ~Publishers Weekly

“A slim debut full of nuanced, clear-eyed tales of unvarnished humanity. […] A formally diverse collection with exquisitely crafted stories about longing, striving, and learning what we can control.” ~Kirkus Reviews

“Challenging assumptions, confronting power, manipulating barriers whenever possible–even at grave personal cost–Bhatt’s cast surprises, inspires, frightens, beguiles, but never disappoints.” ~Shelf Awareness (starred review)

“. . . far from conventional . . . brilliant without showiness, heartbreaking without sentimentality and their insight into human nature is incisive, shrewd and compassionate.” ~Dallas Morning News

Each of Us Killers is Jenny Bhatt’s debut book but you will feel that you have encountered this level of skill, craft, and complexity before in reading the masters of the short story genre— even while the author subverts what we so often encounter in the genre about notions of loss and lonely voices and who gets to tell their own stories.” ~Texas Public Radio

“Bhatt’s deliberate expansion of established tropes about Indians and the Indian diaspora deserves special accolades.” ~Leonard Prize 2020 Nominations, National Book Critics Circle

“. . . in each story Bhatt peels back shells of self-awareness, revealing understandings of the often subtle distinctions of gender, race, and family expectations that define and confine them.” ~The National Book Review

“. . . Bhatt gets under the skin of her characters with an ease that is difficult to achieve when creating characters beyond the pale of capital and caste. [. . .] using lively, sculpted language that avoids the stilted, literary English often afflicting Indian English writing.” ~The Hindu

“Built on a variety of literary techniques of plot, style, and voice—including the refreshing second-person singular and first-person plural—Bhatt’s stories effortlessly straddle class, caste, gender, and race divides spanning the US, England, and India.” ~Open The Magazine

“Taken together, [the stories] show Bhatt’s wide range, both in theme and style, and her ability to inhabit characters who couldn’t be more different from each other.” ~New York Journal of Books

“Interspersing loss and longing, survival and success, in an array of memories, shades, moods, dreams (at places of employment in particular) at the core of her narratives, Bhatt packs in a powerful compilation, rich in prose and poetry . . .” ~NRI Pulse

“Even though it is a debut collection, it brings a range of lived experience, experimentation, and stylistic variety, which announces a seasoned practitioner rather than a newcomer to fiction.” ~India Currents

“. . . a collection that is as important in the telling as in remembering the times we live in and the times to come.” ~The Hindu Business Line

“Another strength of Bhatt’s collection is its exploration of South Asian identity in the workplace through a wide lens instead of the traditional representations readers are accustomed to in literature and media.” ~Puerto del Sol

“Bhatt presents characters who are bound to their work, either by choice or circumstance, as they attempt to thwart societal expectations and break down barriers that stand in their way.” ~Phoebe Journal

“There is a vibrancy in viewing the work as a whole, an excitement to finishing a story and wondering what the next will bring. This all makes Each of Us Killers as compulsively readable as it is sharp, and as enjoyable as it is thought-provoking; in short, an accomplished and impressive debut.” ~Vagabond City

“In ‘Each of Us Killers’, the reader takes an excursion around the world, getting to interact with multiple voices, listening to the struggles of various characters and enjoying cultural details through the incredible use of language and literary techniques. While each story might be a sojourn, the entire collection is an enlightening voyage.” ~Platform Magazine

“We rarely think of a collection of short stories as being a ‘state of the nation’ work of fiction [. . .] and yet added together, that’s really what the Indian stories in this book amount to.” ~The Short Story (TSS) UK

“At its core, Each of Us Killers is a book about desire. Bhatt’s characters hunger for professional fulfillment, for a different world, and for each other. Their desire is resistance: in the face of hegemonic violence, in a world predicated on their erasure, Bhatt’s characters choose life.” ~Pleiades Magazine

“Her empathetic pursuit of understanding “through the lens of work,” as Bhatt puts it, facilitate not just the un-silencing of ideals, motivations, and vulnerabilities of her characters, but also help to contextualize the burdens they shoulder in environments and situations that may be familiar to us. In reading their stories and acquainting ourselves with their struggles, we thus understand how we may be more complicit in the lives they lead, and the deaths they endure, than we would like to think.” ~Singapore Unbound

The Writer | Getting to know desi literature. Interview by Yi Shun Lai. June 2022.

Bookriot | Is there such a thing as a reliable narrator? In conversation with Stacey Lee Megally. April 2022.

Bookriot | Launching a Book During a Pandemic: Authors on Pivoting, Promoting, and Perspective. Interview by Stacey Megally. October 2021.

The Creative Process Podcast | Interviewed by Mia Funk and Diya Basu. July 2021.

Seema Magazine | Author Jenny Bhatt Is Testing New Waters. June 2021.

rob mclennan’s blog | 12 or 20 Questions with Jenny Bhatt. May 2021.

Jaggery Lit | Drunk on Ink Q & A with Jenny Bhatt. Interviewed by Soniah Kamal. April 2021.

Shoutout DFW | Meet Jenny Bhatt | Writer; Literary Translator; Literary Critic; Podcast Host (Desi Books); Writing Instructor (Writing Workshops Dallas). April 2021.

The Cardamom Pod | ‘Book Talking’ with podcast host and Kajal Magazine editor-in-chief and founder, Nadya Agrawal. February 2021.

Khabar Magazine | Talk Time: Desi Author and Advocate with Reetika Khanna. February 2021.

Asian Books Blog | Contemporary Voices: Elaine Chiew Chats with Jenny Bhatt, Author of Each of Us Killers. January 2021.

Bloom Site | Interview with Shoba Viswanathan: ‘Writing Beyond Saris and Slums’. December 2020.

This Podcast Will Change Your Life | Interview with Ben Tanzer. December 2020.

Advice to Writers | Interview with Jon Winokur. December 2020.

Columbia Journal | Interview by Shalvi Shah: ‘On Intersectional Character Dynamics & Subverting their Tropes: An Interview with Jenny Bhatt’. November 2020.

Platform Magazine | Interview with Nidhi Verma. Platform Magazine. November 2020.

Scroll.in | Interview with Urvashi Bahuguna: A debut can happen at any age. Coming late to publishing doesn’t mean coming late to writing.’ November 2020.

Electric Literature | Interview with Harsimran Gill: How Much Does Your Job Shape Your Identity? October 2020.

Book Q&A with Deborah Kalb | Interview with Deborah Kalb. October 2020.

PEN America | The PEN Ten Interview with Jared Jackson. October 2020.

The Southeast Review | Interview with Aram Mrjoian. October 2020.

Asian America Podcast | Interview with Ken Fong. September 2020.

The Rumpus | Interview with Madhushree Ghosh: ‘Always the Story First.’ September 2020.

BOMB Magazine | Interview with Anjali Enjeti: ‘Older People Do Reinvent Themselves.’ September 2020.

Writer’s Digest | Interview with Cassandra Lipp: ‘Breaking In: Debut Authors: How They Did It; What They Learned; and Why You Can Do It Too.’ September 2020. (excerpt with permission: Page 1, Page 2)

Maudlin House | Interview with Jaya Wagle: ‘We Avoid Stereotypes by Making Characters More Complex.’ September 2020.

Fierce Womxn Writing Podcast | Interview with Sara Gallagher. September 2020.

City Lights Bookstore | 5 Questions with Jenny Bhatt, Author of Each of Us Killers. September 2020.

Debutiful | Interview with Adam Vitcavage: ‘Jenny Bhatt Wants to Read Every Culture’s Story.’ September 2020.

The Other Stories Podcast | Interview with Ilana Masad; Episode 261 – “Disappointment” by Jenny Bhatt. September 2020.

Rewire News | Interview with Sarah Neilson: ‘What Does It Mean to Be a Black or Brown Person at Work?’ September 2020.

South Asian Avant-Garde Anthology (SAAG) | Video Interview with Kamil Ahsan. September 2020.

Writing Workshops Dallas | Video Interview with Danielle Morvan. August 2020.

Kenyon Review | Summer Reading: KR Recommends. June 2021.

Seema Network | ‘5 of the Best Books of 2020 by South Asian Women’ by Meher Manda. January 2021.

Buzzfeed Books | ‘These Are the Best Book Covers of 2020’ (cover design: Harshad Marathe.) December 2020.

Dhaka Tribune | ‘2020: The Year in Books’. December 2020.

BOMB Magazine | ‘The Intimate Suggests the Epic: A Year in Small Press and Indie Publications’. December 2020.

Largehearted Boy | ‘Favorite Short Story Collections of 2020’ by David Gutowski. December 2020.

Book Riot | ’10 Short Story Collections by Asian Authors Released in 2020′ by Stacey Megally. December 2020.

Bustle Magazine | The Best Short Story Collections of 2020, From ‘Daddy’ to ‘Verge’. October 2020.

The National Book Review | 5 Hot Books. September 2020.

Bloom | FIVE in BLOOM: Latter-Year Reads. September 2020.

The Millions | Tuesday New Release Day: Starring Nunez, Rankine, Bhatt, and More. September 2020.

Bustle Magazine | The Best New Books Out The Week Of September 7. September 2020.

Bustle Magazine | 26 Most Anticipated Books of September 2020. September 2020.

Ms. Magazine | September 2020 Reads for the Rest of Us. September 2020.

Picture Book | New Books Out September 8th. September 2020.

The Millions | September Preview: The Millions Most Anticipated (This Month). September 2020.

Debutiful | 6 Debut Books You Should Read This September. September 2020.

Kirkus Reviews | Fall Preview: Must-Read Story Collections. August 2020.

Entropy Magazine | August and September: Small Press Releases. August 2020.

The Millions | Most Anticipated: The Great Second-Half 2020 Book Preview. July 2020.

Literary Hub | Lit Hub’s Most Anticipated Books of 2020, Part 2. July 2020.

Electric Literature | The Most Anticipated Debuts of the Second Half of 2020. June 2020.

Big Other | Big Other’s Most Anticipated Small Press Books of 2020. January 2020.

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