34. Some Interesting Links

AUGUST 26, 2022: Here’s a set of links to translation-related essays, interviews, podcasts, virtual events, submission calls, and more to start the working week. READ/WATCH: The Most Spoken Languages 2022 (Statistics and Data) READ: Lisa Hofmann-Kuroda On The Importance of Deep, Imaginative, Listening (Electric Literature) READ: Culture Shock: Reassessing the Workshop by Leanne Ogasawara (The… Continue reading 34. Some Interesting Links

33. On the Translator’s Note or Introduction

Long before the idea of even becoming a literary translator professionally had occurred to me, my idea of what exactly being a literary translator meant came from reading the notes or introductions to translated novels. Looking back now, I see how much the good ones were like masterclasses in themselves. If you're a reader of translated works, you will likely have your own favorites. I'll share a handful of mine below but let's talk very briefly about why these matter at all.

32. Salman Rushdie on Literary Translation

I had other plans for this week's topic. But the news of this morning about the attack on the author, Salman Rushdie, has left me a bit shaken. No, I don't know him and I've never met him. But I've probably read every book, every essay, and every interview of his. And all his tweets from 2017-onward when I started following him there. It's curious how a writer can have so much impact on your reading and writing life. I wouldn't even say he was among my top three favorite writers (although, among desi or South Asian writers, he's definitely at the top.)

30. Vincent van Gogh and the Art of Translation

Vincent van Gogh's translations of Millet's paintings were about a "profound and sincere admiration for Millet", to make Millet more accessible to the "ordinary general public", and to recognize how the Impressionist trends of his time were linked to past artistic traditions.

31. For Whom (or Why) Do We Translate?

Every translator's origin story is unique and personal and involves a great deal of happenstance and serendipity (as Mark Polizzotti has written). And, as I've often said before, translations in South Asia are not the same as translations in the western world. We're still trying to discover and recover our literary treasures and traditions from various languages because they'd been marginalized by more dominant cultures.